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Drupal News and Updates

This page will show you the most recent Drupal templates updates and Drupal Community news.

Drupal Templates News and Updates

December 3, 2012. The New Word In Creating Drupal Stores

December 03 2012 | Category: Drupal Updates

The creators of Drupal Commerce decided to bring their favorite CMS to masses. When speaking with one of TemplateMonster’s Drupal developers, he said: “I can’t understand, why users don’t use Drupal, it’s so simple…” Commerce Guys, those who created Drupal Commerce stores, got to be thinking that way.

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May 03, 2012 – Drupal 7.14 released

May 09 2012 | Category: Drupal Updates

(Russian) В этой заметке вы узнаете о проблемах сопутствующих обновлению ядра Drupal 7.14.

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Responsive Drupal templates

April 09 2012 | Category: Drupal Updates

Responsive Drupal templates include several layout options – each is optimized for proper screen resolution.

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Drupal 6.19 templates

April 26 2011 | Category: Drupal Updates

Drupal templates starting from #30278 are compatible Drupal 6.19

Drupal 6.19 release anouncement is available here. You can also check the release notes to see the updates…

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Drupal 7 templates are available

April 26 2011 | Category: Drupal Updates

Drupal templates starting from #32668 are compatible with Drupal 7

Drupal 7 features:

  • Vastly improved administrative user interface thanks to the D7UX movement
  • Flexible content and custom fields
  • Better visual presentation and theming with Render API
  • Accessibility is greatly improved
  • Image support is now included
  • Automated code testing
  • Improved database support
  • Better distribution support
  • Support for the Semantic Web through
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Drupal 6.17 compatible templates

June 22 2010 | Category: Drupal Updates

Drupal templates starting from #29476 are compatible with Drupal 6.17

Drupal 6.17, a maintenance release fixing issues reported through the bug tracking system, is now available for download. There are no security fixes in this release. Upgrading your existing Drupal 6 sites is recommended. For more information about the Drupal 6.x release series, consult the Drupal 6.0 release announcement.

Highlights …

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Drupal Themes are Now Available!

April 04 2008 | Category: Drupal Updates

After having launched Joomla and Mambo CMS templates last fall we have noticed that even though these two product types are strikingly popular the audience still wants more. Therefore in response to this growing demand for various CMS products we have decided to be so kind and to launch a new CMS designs range which we have chosen to be …

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Drupal News and Updates

How is Drupal 8 doing?

28 April 2016, 7:46 pm

Republished from buytaert.net

The one big question I get asked over and over these days is: "How is Drupal 8 doing?". It's understandable. Drupal 8 is the first new version of Drupal in five years and represents a significant rethinking of Drupal.

So how is Drupal 8 doing? With less than half a year since Drupal 8 was released, I'm happy to answer: outstanding!

As of late March, Drupal.org counted over 60,000 Drupal 8 sites. Looking back at the first four months of Drupal 7, about 30,000 sites had been counted. In other words, Drupal 8 is being adopted twice as fast as Drupal 7 had been in its first four months following the release.

As we near the six-month mark since releasing Drupal 8, the question "How is Drupal 8 doing?" takes on more urgency for the Drupal community with a stake in its success. For the answer, I can turn to years of experience and say while the number of new Drupal projects typically slows down in the year leading up to the release of a new version; adoption of the newest version takes up to a full year before we see the number of new projects really take off.

Drupal 8 is the middle of an interesting point in its adoption cycle. This is the phase where customers are looking for budgets to pay for migrations. This is the time when people focus on learning Drupal 8 and its new features. This is when the modules that extend and enhance Drupal need to be ported to Drupal 8; and this is the time when Drupal shops and builders are deep in the three to six month sales cycle it takes to sell Drupal 8 projects. This is often a phase of uncertainty but all of this is happening now, and every day there is less and less uncertainty. Based on my past experience, I am confident that Drupal 8 will be adopted at "full-force" by the end of 2016.

A few weeks ago I launched the Drupal 2016 product survey to take pulse of the Drupal community. I plan to talk about the survey results in my DrupalCon keynote in New Orleans on May 10th but in light of this blog post I felt the results to one of the questions is worth sharing and commenting on sooner:

Survey drupal adoption


Over 1,800 people have answered that question so far. People were allowed to pick up to 3 answers for the single question from a list of answers. As you can see in the graph, the top two reasons people say they haven't upgraded to Drupal 8 yet are (1) the fact that they are waiting for contributed modules to become available and (2) they are still learning Drupal 8. The results from the survey confirm what we see every release of Drupal; it takes time for the ecosystem, both the technology and the people, to come along.

Fortunately, many of the most important modules, such as Rules, Pathauto, Metatag, Field Collection, Token, Panels, Services, and Workbench Moderation, have already been ported and tested for Drupal 8. Combined with the fact that many important modules, like Views and CKEditor, moved to core, I believe we are getting really close to being able to build most websites with Drupal 8.

The second reason people cited for not jumping onto Drupal 8 yet was that they are still learning Drupal 8. One of the great strengths of Drupal has long been the willingness of the community to share its knowledge and teach others how to work with Drupal. We need to stay committed to educating builders and developers who are new to Drupal 8, and DrupalCon New Orleans is an excellent opportunity to share expertise and learn about Drupal 8.

What is most exciting to me is that less than 3% answered that they plan to move off Drupal altogether, and therefore won't upgrade at all. Non-response bias aside, that is an incredible number as it means the vast majority of Drupal users plan to eventually upgrade.

Yes, Drupal 8 is a significant rethinking of Drupal from the version we all knew and loved for so long. It will take time for the Drupal community to understand Drupal's new design and capabilities and how to harness that power but I am confident Drupal 8 is the right technology at the right time, and the adoption numbers so far back that up. Expect Drupal 8 adoption to start accelerating.

Comment on buytaert.net

Front page news: 

Applaud the Drupal Maintainers

22 April 2016, 4:18 pm

Republished from buytaert.net

Today is another big day for Drupal as we just released Drupal 8.1.0. Drupal 8.1.0 is an important milestone as it is a departure from the Drupal 7 release schedule where we couldn't add significant new features until Drupal 8. Drupal 8.1.0 balances maintenance with innovation.

On my blog and in presentations, I often talk about the future of Drupal and where we need to innovate. I highlight important developments in the Drupal community, and push my own ideas to disrupt the status quo. People, myself included, like to talk about the shiny innovations, but it is crucial to understand that innovation is only a piece of how we grow Drupal's success. What can't be forgotten is the maintenance, the bug fixing, the work on Drupal.org and our test infrastructure, the documentation writing, the ongoing coordination and the processes that allow us to crank out stable releases.

We often recognize those who help Drupal innovate or introduce novel things, but today, I'd like us to praise those who maintain and improve what already exists and that was innovated years ago. So much of what makes Drupal successful is the "daily upkeep". The seemingly mundane and unglamorous effort that goes into maintaining Drupal has a tremendous impact on the daily life of hundreds of thousands of Drupal developers, millions of Drupal content managers, and billions of people that visit Drupal sites. Without that maintenance, there would be no stability, and without stability, no room for innovation.

Comment on buytaert.net

Front page news: 

Drupal 8.1.0 is now available

20 April 2016, 7:48 am

Drupal 8.1.0, the first minor release of Drupal 8, is now available. With Drupal 8, we made significant changes in our release process, adopting semantic versioning and scheduled feature releases. This allows us to make extensive improvements to Drupal 8 in a timely fashion while still providing backwards compatibility. Drupal 8.1.0 is the first such update.

What's new in Drupal 8.1.x?

Drupal 8.1.0 comes with numerous improvements, including CKEditor WYSIWYG enhancements, added APIs, an improved help page, and two new experimental modules. (Experimental modules are provided with Drupal core for testing purposes, but are not yet fully supported.)

Experimental UI for migrations from Drupal 6 and 7

Drupal 8.1.0 now includes the Migrate Drupal UI module, which provides a user interface for Drupal core migrations. Use it to migrate Drupal 6 or 7 sites to Drupal 8. The user guide on migrating from Drupal 6 or 7 to Drupal 8 has full documentation. Note that the Drupal 8 Migrate module suite is still experimental and has known issues. Read below for specific information on migrating Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 sites with 8.1.0. (Always back up your data before performing a migration and review the results carefully.)

Migration related modules in Drupal 8.1.0

BigPipe for perceived performance

The Drupal 8 BigPipe module provides an advanced implementation of Facebook's BigPipe page rendering strategy, leading to greatly improved perceived performance for pages with dynamic, personalized, or uncacheable content. See the BigPipe documentation.

CKEditor WYSIWYG spellchecking and language button

New CKEditor features in Drupal 8.1.0

Drupal 8.0.0 included the CKEditor module (a WYSIWYG editor), but it was not previously possible to use your browser's built-in spell checker with it to check the text. With Drupal 8.1.0, spellchecking is now enabled within CKEditor as well.

Another great improvement is the addition of the optional language markup button in CKEditor. When configured to appear in your editing toolbar, it allows you to assign language information to parts of the text, which is useful for accessibility and machine processing.

Improved help page with tours

Drupal 8.0.0 included a new system for help tutorials called tours with the core Tour module. In Drupal 8.1.0, we made these tours easier to discover by listing them in the administrative help overview at /admin/help.

Improved help page in Drupal 8.1.0

The help overview page is also more flexible now, so contributed modules can add sections to it and themes can override its appearance more easily. You can read more about the new system in the change record for the updated help page, or refer to the Tour API documentation for how to add tours for your modules.

Rendered entities in Views fields

Drupal 8.1.0 now includes a rendered entity field handler for Views, which allows placing a fully rendered entity within a view field. For example, this feature could be used to display a rendered user profile for each node author in a table listing node content. (This feature was provided by the Entity contributed module in Drupal 7, but had not yet been available in Drupal 8.)

Support for JavaScript automated testing

Drupal 8.1.0 adds support for automated testing of JavaScript, which will mean fewer bugs with Drupal's JavaScript functionality in the future as we write new tests for it. (Read more about how to run the JavaScript tests.) There are also other improvements to the testing system, including improved reporting of PHPUnit and other test results.

Improved Composer support

Starting with Drupal 8.1.x, Drupal core and its dependencies are packaged by Composer on Drupal.org. This means that sites and modules can now also use Composer to manage all of their third-party dependencies (rather than having to work around the vendor directory that previously shipped with core).

Developer API improvements

Minor releases like Drupal 8.1.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features. Read the 8.1.0 release notes for more details on the many improvements for developers in this release.

What does this mean to me?

Drupal 8 site owners

Update to 8.1.0 to continue receiving bug and security fixes. The next bugfix release, 8.1.1, is scheduled for May 4, 2016.

Updating your site from 8.0.6 to 8.1.0 with update.php is exactly the same as updating from 8.0.5 to 8.0.6. Modules, themes, and translations may need small changes for this minor release, so test the update carefully before updating your production site.

Drupal 6 site owners

Drupal 6 is not supported anymore. Create a Drupal 8 site and try migrating your data into it as soon as possible. Your Drupal 6 site can still remain up and running while you test migrating your Drupal 6 data into your new Drupal 8 site. Note that there are known issues with the experimental Migrate module suite. If you find a new bug not covered by one of these issues, your detailed bug report with steps to reproduce is a big help!

Drupal 7 site owners

Drupal 7 is still fully supported and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout all minor releases of Drupal 8.

The new Migrate Drupal UI for Migrate also allows migrating a Drupal 7 site into a Drupal 8 site, but the migration path from Drupal 7 to 8 is not complete, so you may encounter errors or missing migrations when you try to migrate. That said, since your Drupal 7 site can remain up and running while you test migrating into a new Drupal 8 site, you can help us stabilize the Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 migration path! Testing and bug reports from your real-world Drupal 7 sites will help us stabilize this functionality sooner for everyone. (Search the known issues.)

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 8.1.0 are backwards-compatible, so modules, themes, and translations that support Drupal 8.0.x will be compatible with 8.1.x as well. However, the new version does include some string changes, minor UI changes, and internal API changes (as well as more significant changes to experimental modules like the Migrate suite). This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. See the announcement of the 8.1.0 release candidate for more background information.

State of Drupal 2016 survey

13 April 2016, 3:21 pm

Reposted from buytaert.net

I've been writing a lot about what I believe is important for the future of Drupal, but now it is your turn. After every major release of Drupal I do a "product management survey" to get your ideas and data on what to focus on for future releases of Drupal (8.x/9).

The last time we had such a survey was after the release of Drupal 7, six months into the development of Drupal 8. I presented the results at DrupalCon London in 2011. The results informed the Drupal community at large, but were also the basis for defining initiatives for Drupal 8. This time around, I'm hoping for similar impact, but also some higher-level strategic thinking about how Drupal should respond to various market trends.

Take the State of Drupal 2016 survey now

It shouldn't take more than 10-15 minutes to fill out the survey. We'd like to hear from everyone who cares about Drupal: content managers, site owners, site builders, module developers, front-end developers, people selling and marketing Drupal, etc. Whether you are a Drupal expert or just getting started with Drupal, every voice counts! Best of all, with Drupal 8's new 6-month release cycle, we can act on the results of this survey much sooner than in the past.

I will be presenting the results during my DrupalCon New Orleans keynote (the video recording of the keynote, the presentation slides and the survey results will be downloadable on my blog after). Please tell us what you think about Drupal; your feedback will shape future versions of Drupal.

Front page news: 

A new design system for Drupal.org

12 April 2016, 1:17 am

As mentioned in our previous post, one of the initiatives we are working on this year is building a new visual system for Drupal.org.

It has been 7 years since Mark Boulton worked on a design plan for Drupal.org. Since then the web has come a long way. So has Drupal. Drupal.org needs a modern design, and the Product team at the Drupal Association has been working steadfastly on a plan to make that happen.

Building on insights from our user research and content strategy work, we have begun laying out a foundation for the future design system for the site.

Goal

Update Drupal.org to reflect the flexibility, modernity, and community of Drupal itself.

Design Principles

Before we started work on the design for Drupal.org we needed to iron out our process and the principles we wanted to keep in mind throughout our work.

To that end, tvn and I holed up for a weekend design retreat, which resulted in tons of post-it notes about what Drupal.org design looks like, what it should look like, and what we can learn from others -- to develop the design principles that will move Drupal.org forward.

After much deliberation, condensing, rewriting, and discussion with the wider Engineering and Communication teams, these are the principles we found to be our best guiding mantras:

Start with user needs.
We only design for real people. We verify their needs and let that information be our guide when designing anything.

Keep it simple. Focus.
We do less, but better. We focus on the areas we can have the most impact. Our designs are simple and clean, and our messages are clear. We strive for brevity and avoid clutter.

Be consistent. Re-use.
Our designs should be part of a consistent, cohesive system. We don’t introduce new patterns if we can re-use or improve any of the existing ones.

Be accessible.
Our designs should be usable by anyone, on any device or screen size, on a high speed connection or a slow network, by people with different native languages, and regardless of their accessibility needs.

Be relevant. Try new things.
Our designs are relevant and fresh. We keep up with the latest trends and are not afraid to try something new.

Iterate quickly.
We do small and quick iterations, continuously improving the experience. We experiment and test out different approaches.

Use Data.
We use data to support and drive our decisions. This includes analytics, data from testing and experiments, data gleaned through user research methods including interviews, surveys, and so on.

Work openly. Be honest.
Our designs are honest and authentic, and our intentions are transparent. We call things what they are. We respect our community values. We communicate openly and often.

Engage and empower.
We design experiences that unite our users and empower them to collaborate and do great things, because they can.

Be friendly.
We create friendly and welcoming environments. We want our users to feel welcome and supported.

Design Vision

Once we had our design principles in place we needed to move from those abstract guidelines to actual design plans for the website.

After DrupalCon Barcelona, we set aside time for another design retreat. This time tvn lost her voice on day 2, so miming and typing became a fun part of the workflow.

Our first step was to create a mood board of inspirational user interfaces to give us a beginning design language and a starting point for discussion.

Then we began our work with style tiles. I created four first drafts, informed by our mood board. One was softer, with varying shades of blue. At the other extreme was a largely monochrome design, with only tiny hints of the Drupal blue. After a few rounds of reviews and revisions we came up with the following visual system, which we feel matches our goals and gives a general idea of the mood, colors, and visuals we plan to move towards.

drupal.org style tile

The general mood here was inspired by the idea of builders and makers working together to build something larger. We combine blueprint textures, single-width line icons, and an open typeface to make Drupal.org feel like the home to a continually improving framework.

We’ve kept the Drupal blue, and tweaked our green to bring it to a cooler shade. We’ve added darker tones for every color to give us more opportunity for high contrast.

The end goal is to make Drupal.org a useful space for contributors and users alike with a consistent quality of design throughout the site.

To that end, we’ve started work on a pattern library which will categorize all of the different design patterns used on Drupal.org. As we build out new patterns for new features they will be added to the library as well. The styles will be automatically inherited from the theme, which will make maintenance of the library as simple as adding relevant content to a page.

Iterative Approach

To support our current prioritization we knew we would need to use a very iterative process for launching design updates. Our strategy is to make design updates as we can when a new feature is prioritized. As each area of the site is functionally improved, it receives visual improvements as well. You’ve seen some of these updates already in the Drupal 8 launch and in the smaller updates to Drupal.org since last November.

drupal 8 landing page

drupal 8 landing page

With the Drupal 8 launch came a re-styled header for Drupal.org.

drupal 8 header and membership drive

Release pages also received a small update to the download area, with clearer calls to action.

Shortly after that, we held a membership drive with a banner and a front page region highlighting community members. And just a few weeks ago we set up a new banner for promoting community elections to the Board, which can also be used for any important announcements going forward.

Next Steps

Our next big project is Documentation. We’ve been toiling away on these features for months now as part of our overall content restructure work. After the first pass of wireframes and design mockups, we collected input from documentation users via usability testing held remotely and in person at the Drupal Association office in Portland, Oregon, and at DrupalCamp London. Based on all the feedback, we've done a few revisions on our initial ideas and designs. We've spoken with a wide range of community members, from newcomers to masters, and their input was invaluable for arriving at a design that really works for the user.

documentation page

You can see some of the new patterns we’ve begun work on in this mockup, such as the documentation section header and tags. We also have a pattern for related content which isn’t visible in the image. In our usability testing, we found that wayfinders were incredibly important to the experience of documentation, so we spent considerable time on improving the breadcrumbs and menu navigational patterns before arriving at what you see above.

How to get involved

There are a number of ways to get involved in improving Drupal.org. You can read more about general volunteering here.

If you’re interested in joining our usability testing sessions held both remotely and in person at major Drupal events, please fill out this form and we’ll reach out to you when the next session is being planned.

To post an issue about design on Drupal.org, use the project issue queue at Drupal.org Design. This issue queue will replace the Bluecheese theme queue going forward as a central place to report issues or inconsistencies with Drupal.org design. Meta discussions of design on Drupal.org are also welcome in the queue.

If you’d like to participate in quick design discussions about Drupal.org and be available to give feedback on upcoming design decisions, join us on Slack at channel #drupalorg-design.

As we incrementally roll out new features, you’ll see Drupal.org move ever closer to our updated visual system. Thanks for coming along for the ride!

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

Drupal.org updates

Syntax Highlighting

A WYSIWYG editor(CKEditor) is coming to Drupal.org soon to improve the editorial experience- and to take advantage of the same functionality that made CKEditor the choice for Drupal 8 core. However, as a stepping stone to that goal, we need to ensure that the formatting of <code> blocks throughout Drupal.org is preserved.

This has lead us to using Prism.js for syntax highlighting on Drupal.org. You can see this change in any <code> or <?php> block throughout the site, such as this example of function hook_field_info_alter(); below:

function hook_field_info_alter(&$info) {
  // Change the default widget for fields of type 'foo'.
  if (isset($info['foo'])) {
    $info['foo']['default widget'] = 'mymodule_widget';
  }
}

This is the first step, but with a better syntax highlighting library in place, we are pushing hard to make CKEditor itself available on Drupal.org.

Documentation Usability Testing

In March members of the Drupal Association engineering team also spent time doing usability testing with a prototype of our new Documentation content type. This testing, performed with a representative sample of users of different experience levels with Drupal, helped validate our design direction for new Documentation pages and Documentation Guides on Drupal.org, and gave us some valuable feedback for further refining our design as we move into implementation. While we're not yet ready to share all the details of the new Documentation experience, we're very excited to share this with the community soon.

Release File Hashes

A file hash can be used to verify the integrity of a file downloaded from a trusted source. Drupal.org provided an md5 hash on the list of a project's releases (here's the release listing for Drupal core, for example), but we have expanded the file hash options to include: md5, sha-1, and sha-256.

Because many users do not use file hashes, these hashes are not displayed by default. Any user who does want to access these file hashes can do so from a toggle on the sidebar of a release page. Your preference for what file hash to view will be saved in your browser's local storage and displayed on all other release pages. The new sha-1 hashes will also be used in upcoming Composer integration.

Communications channels

Taking advantage of the new Sections and Blogs on Drupal.org, we're gradually working on improving our communication channels. It starts with the Drupal blog, and the Drupal.org blog (which you're reading now!) - but will soon affect all the ways we communicate about Drupal the software and Drupal.org the site.

You can learn more about communication channels here.

2016 Elections Complete

”Hands

Lastly, but certainly not least - the 2016 election for the Drupal Association At-Large board member ended in March. For the first time, we promoted the voting process to all eligible voters with a targeted banner on Drupal.org. This gave us the broadest reach we've ever had when electing a board member, and the most ballots submitted. You can learn more about the elections process and the final vote here.

Congratulations Shayamala Rajaram - and thank you for supporting the community by joining the board!

Sustaining support and maintenance

Drupal.org Outages

Unfortunately our work in March was disrupted on several occasions by a particularly tricky series of outages. Seemingly at random one of the Drupal.org webnodes would experience cache corruption and begin serving 500 errors. The issues did not seem to be related to a recent change, a singular area of the site, or an increase in traffic. After some diligent sleuthing we began to see some patterns in the cache corruption.

In the end, we were able to determine that all the outages were linked to the same bug in Drupal core's handling of SchemaCache. Drupal.org has been patched and since then no cache corruption incidents have recurred. With a bit more community review (you can help!), hopefully the fix will be committed to core so other affected sites will not encounter the same issue that we did.

More Improvements and Bug Fixes

We made a few other infrastructural improvements and bug fixes in March as well. Not the least of these was deploying dedicated beanstalkd queue servers, to improve the reliability of Drupal.org job queues, especially when recovering from disruption.

We also fixed a regression on groups.drupal.org caused by the upgrade to PHP 5.4 the previous month. A bug in the date chooser caused the date of an event to be reset whenever the event was edited- an issue that we know was frustrating to many in the community who organize local events.

Lastly, we fixed an issue on jobs.drupal.org to make it easier for companies to renew their featured job listings (without having to reach out to us for manual support). We're seeing a marked increase in the Drupal Jobs interest since the launch of Drupal 8 and we'll continue to improve the Drupal Jobs platform to foster the Drupal ecosystem.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

The first release candidate for the upcoming Drupal 8.1.0 release is now available for testing. With Drupal 8, we made major changes in our release process, adopting semantic versioning and scheduled releases. This allows us to make significant improvements to Drupal 8 in a timely fashion while still providing backwards compatibility. Drupal 8.1.0 will be the first such update, expected to be released April 20.

8.1.x includes an experimental user interface for migrating from Drupal 6 and 7, the BigPipe module for increasing perceived site performance, and more. You can read a detailed list of improvements in the announcements of beta1 and beta2.

What does this mean to me?

For Drupal 8 site owners

The final bugfix release of 8.0.x has been released. 8.0.x will receive no further releases following 8.1.0, and sites should prepare to update from 8.0.x to 8.1.x in order to continue getting bug and security fixes. Use update.php to update your 8.0.x sites to the 8.1.x series, just as you would to update from (e.g.) 8.0.4 to 8.0.5. You can use this release candidate to test the update. (Always back up your data before updating sites, and do not test updates in production.)

Drupal 8 release cycle diagram, showing the 8.1.x beta and RC phases beginning as 8.0.x nears its end in April, and 8.0.x support ending when 8.1.x is released.

For module and theme authors

Drupal 8.1.x is backwards-compatible with 8.0.x. However, it does include internal API changes and API changes to experimental modules, so some minor updates may be required. Review the change records for 8.1.x, and test modules and themes with the release candidate now.

For translators

Some text changes were made since Drupal 8.0.0. Localize.drupal.org automatically offers these new and modified strings for translation. Strings are frozen with the release candidate, so translators can now update translations.

For core developers

All outstanding issues filed against 8.0.x are automatically migrated to 8.1.x after the final 8.0.x patch release. Future bug reports should be targeted against the 8.1.x branch. 8.2.x will remain open for new development during the 8.1.x release candidate phase. For more information, see the release candidate phase announcement.

Your bug reports help make Drupal better!

Release candidates are a chance to identify bugs for the upcoming release, so help us by searching the issue queue for any bugs you find, and filing a new issue if your bug has not been reported yet.

Note that there are known issues with the experimental Migrate module suite, especially the incomplete Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 migration path. If the bug you find is not covered by one of these issues, your detailed bug report with steps to reproduce is a big help!

Front page news: 
Drupal version: 

Restructuring Drupal.org

6 April 2016, 4:33 pm

In this post I'd like to talk about one of our major projects for 2016, which comes as a follow up to the content strategy project of 2015.

Content restructure

Last year we presented our findings from the content strategy developed by Drupal Association staff in collaboration with Forum One. This year we're focusing on bringing as many of those ideas to life as we can. We call this implementation phase 'content restructure'. We'll look at one area of the site at a time, audit its content, change the way it is created and stored (content type) if needed, redesign the way it looks and reorganize it into a more usable and findable structure, improving content quality and giving content creators better tools to maintain it along the way.

The backbone of the new content structure are 'sections' or top level groupings of content. We created infrastructure to make those possible and have already launched the first few.

Together with sections we've been rolling out blogs to improve how we communicate about specific topics on Drupal.org. Recently, I talked in more detail how blogs and sections fit into our overall plan of making it easier to communicate important announcements and news to the Drupal community.

Our current focus is Documentation area of the site. We're working on a complete revamp that will change the way documentation looks and works, and will change the way users can navigate and improve documentation. We're working closely with the Documentation Working Group and performing rounds of usability testing to ensure the changes we are working on will improve the user experience across the board. More details on this can be found in the issue queue.

A big part of the content restructure plan is a content audit and migration. This is especially true for documentation revamp, where we have thousands of pages to migrate into the new system. We'll be turning to the community to help us with this effort. Not only because that's too many pages for a small team like ours to migrate on our own, but also because we need subject matter experts to look at a lot of the pages and evaluate how accurate they are, whether they should be migrated or archived, and so on.

More than just content

Along with the content restructure project, we'll be doing important work that complements and supports it, though each component is not a discrete project on its own.

Developing visual design system

The current Drupal.org design is based on branding and design work done in 2008 by Mark Boulton Design and Leisa Reichelt. They did a great job, but even the most beautiful site will age. Since more than seven years have elapsed since the last redesign, it's time to update the site for a more contemporary look.

Our quest towards updating Drupal.org visually started in 2014 with the user research project, which brought us user personas. The next big step was the content strategy project, which laid the groundwork for the content restructure work discussed above.

Building on what we learned about our users, and how to structure our content to best serve their needs, this year we'll be introducing the new visual design system for the site. There will not be a single, comprehensive launch, where you wake up and suddenly Drupal.org looks completely different. We'll do it iteratively, in parallel with the content restructure, by redesigning the specific area of the site we are focusing on at a given time. This approach lets us introduce visual changes sooner, and iteratively improve and refine them as we go. In fact, you've already seen some of the elements of the new visual system appear with the Drupal 8 launch.

Later this week, our designer DyanneNova will share a bit more details about the work we've already done towards the new system and our next steps.

Updating content style guide

Along with restructuring content we also want to improve the quality of the existing content during migrations, as well as the quality of the content that will be created in the future. To this end, we'll be taking a look at the content style guide, and plan to refresh and update it. We also anticipate expanding the guide to add information about specific content types and communication channels.

Capturing user engagement and contribution

Another aspect of our content restructure work will touch on user engagement and contribution. As we go area through area of the site, redesigning it and improving its content, we'll be looking at what type of user engagement and contributions happen in that area. We'll be looking for opportunities to better capture them, and subsequently better recognize and display those contributions. For example, right now 'documentation edits' count on user profiles show the number of edits user has done to 'book page' content type items, which may or may not be documentation. We'll make that calculation more precise to display the actual documentation edits. We'll also be able to display specific parts of documentation a user maintains, similar to projects they maintain.

Increasing sustainability

An ongoing challenge at the Drupal Association is ensuring we have sustainable revenue to support our work for the community. As we do this work, we will be looking into improving existing revenue opportunities and introducing new ones to make Drupal.org more sustainable. We will also work closely with partners who may be willing to sponsor specific improvements to Drupal.org on behalf of the community.

Other initiatives

The content restructure is not the only project we are working on right now. Some of the other initiatives will be described in future posts. Check our Roadmap to see all the things in progress.

And if you happen to be at DrupalCon New Orleans this May, come to our session to get further updates on some of the topics discussed in this blog.

Republished from Buytaert.net

At DrupalCon Mumbai I sat down for several hours with the Drupal team at Pfizer to understand the work they have been doing on improving Drupal content management features. They built a set of foundational modules that help advance Drupal's content workflow capabilities; from content staging, to multi-site content staging, to better auditability, offline support, and several key user experience improvements like full-site preview, and more. In this post, I want to point a spotlight on some of Pfizer's modules, and kick-off an initial discussion around the usefulness of including some of these features in core.

Use cases

Before jumping to the technical details, let's talk a bit more about the problems these modules are solving.

  1. Cross-site content staging — In this case you want to synchronize content from one site to another. The first site may be a staging site where content editors make changes. The second site may be the live production site. Changes are previewed on the stage site and then pushed to the production site. More complex workflows could involve multiple staging environments like multiple sites publishing into a single master site.
  2. Content branching — For a new product launch you might want to prepare a version of your site with a new section on the site featuring the new product. The new section would introduce several new pages, updates to existing pages, and new menu items. You want to be able to build out the updated version in a self-contained 'branch' and merge all the changes as a whole when the product is ready to launch. In an election case scenario, you might want to prepare multiple sections; one for each candidate that could win.
  3. Preview your site — When you're building out a new section on your site for launch, you want to preview your entire site, as it will look on the day it goes live. This is effectively content staging on a single site.
  4. Offline browse and publish — Here is a use-case that Pfizer is trying to solve. A sales rep goes to a hospital and needs access to information when there is no wi-fi or a slow connection. The site should be fully functional in offline mode and any changes or forms submitted, should automatically sync and resolve conflicts when the connection is restored.
  5. Content recovery — Even with confirmation dialogs, people delete things they didn’t want to delete. This case is about giving users the ability to “undelete” or recover content that has been deleted from their database.
  6. Audit logs — For compliance reasons, some organizations need all content revisions to be logged, with the ability to review content that has been deleted and connect each action to a specific user so that employees are accountable for their actions in the CMS.

Technical details

All these use cases share a few key traits:

  1. Content needs to be synchronized from one place to another, e.g. from workspace to workspace, from site to site or from frontend to backend
  2. Full revision history needs to be kept
  3. Content revision conflicts needs to be tracked

Much of this started as a single module: Deploy. The Deploy module was first created by Greg Dunlap for Drupal 6 in 2008. In 2012, Greg handed over maintainership to Dick Olsson who created the first Drupal 7 version (7.x-2.x) with many big improvements. Later, Dave Hall created a second Drupal 7 version (7.x-3.x) which more significant improvements based on feedback from different users. Today, both Dick and Dave work at Pfizer and have continued to include lessons learned in the Drupal 8 version of the module. After years of experience working on Deploy module and various redesigns, the team has extracted the functionality in a set of modules:

Multiversion

This module does three things: (1) it adds revision support for all content entities in Drupal, not just nodes and block content as provided by core, and (2) it introduces the concept of parent revisions so you can create different branches of your content or site, and (3) it keeps track of conflicts in the revision tree (e.g. when two revisions share the same parent). Many of these features complement the ongoing improvements to Drupal's Entity API.

Replication

Built on top of Multiversion module, this lightweight module reads revision information stored by Multiversion, and uses that to determine what revisions are missing from a given location and lets you replicate content between a source and a target location. The next two modules, Workspace and RELAXed Web Services depend on replication module.

Workspace

This module enables single site content staging and full-site previews. The UI lets you create workspaces and switch between them. With Replication module different workspaces on the same site can behave like different editorial environments.

RELAXed Web Services

This module facilitates cross-site content staging. It provides a more extensive REST API for Drupal with support for UUIDs, translations, file attachments and parent revisions — all important to solve unique challenges with content staging (e.g. UUID and revision information is needed to resolve merge conflicts). The RELAXed Web Services module extends the Replication module and makes it possible to replicate content from local workspaces to workspaces on remote sites using this API.

In short, Multiversion provides the "storage plumbing", whereas Replication, Workspace, and RELAXed Web Services, provide the "transport plumbing".

Deploy

Historically Deploy module has taken care of everything from bottom to top related to content staging. But for Drupal 8 Deploy has been rewritten to just provide a UI on-top of the Workspace and Replication modules. This UI lets you manage content deployments between workspaces on a single site, or between workspaces across sites (if used together with RELAXed Web Services module). The maintainers of the Deploy module have put together a marketing site with more details on what it does: http://www.drupaldeploy.org.

Trash

To handle use case #5 (content recovery) the Trash module was implemented to restore entities marked as deleted. Much like a desktop trash or recycle bin, the module displays all entities from all supported content types where the default revision is flagged as deleted. Restoring creates a newer revision, which is not flagged as deleted.

Synchronizing sites with a battle-tested API

When a Drupal site installs and enables RELAXed Web Services it will look and behave like the REST API from CouchDB. This is a pretty clever trick because it enables us to leverage the CouchDB ecosystem of tools. For example, you can use PouchDB, a JavaScript implementation of CouchDB, to provide a fully-decoupled offline database in the web browser or on a mobile device. Using the same API design as CouchDB also gives you "streaming replication" with instant updates between the backend and frontend. This is how Pfizer implements off-line browse and publish.


Switching between multiple workspaces

This animated gif shows how a content creator can switch between multiple workspaces and get a full-site preview on a single site. In this example the Live workspace is empty, while there has been a lot of content addition on the Stage workspace in.


Deploying a workspace

This animated gif shows how a workspace is deployed from 'Stage' to 'Live' on a single site. In this example the Live workspace is initially empty.

Conclusion

Drupal 8.0 core packed many great improvements, but we didn't focus much on advancing Drupal's content workflow capabilities. As we think about Drupal 8.x and beyond, it might be good to move some of our focus to features like content staging, better audit-ability, off-line support, full-site preview, and more. If you are a content manager, I'd love to hear what you think about better supporting some or all of these use cases. And if you are a developer, I encourage you to take a look at these modules, try them out and let us know what you think.

Thanks to Tim Millwood, Dick Olsson and Nathaniel Catchpole for their feedback on the blog post. Special thanks to Pfizer for contributing to Drupal.

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Front page news: 

Last year, in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

This year the nominations are open until 10th April 2016 (Midnight GMT).

This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

The inaugural Aaron Winborn Award was given to Cathy Theys at DrupalCon Barcelona - see the announcement on the Drupal Association blog.

Thanks to Hans Riemenschneider for the suggestion, and the Drupal Association executive board for backing this idea and the budget. We feel this award is a fitting honor to someone who gave so much to Drupal both on a technical and personal level.

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award you can make your nomination here:

https://www.drupal.org/aaron-winborn-award

Front page news: 

Republished from buytaert.net

The authoring experience improvements we made in Drupal 8 appear to be well-received, but that doesn't mean we are done. With semantic versioning in Drupal 8, we can now make more UX changes in follow-up releases of Drupal 8. So now is a good time to start moving Drupal's user experience forward.

The goal of this post is to advance the conversation we started over a month ago in a blog post talking about the concept of turning Drupal outside-in. In today's blog post, we'll show concrete examples of how we could make site building in Drupal easier by embracing the concept of outside-in. We hope to provide inspiration to designers, core contributors and module maintainers for how we can improve the user experience of Drupal 8.2 and beyond.

What is outside-in?

In Drupal you often have to build things from the ground up. If you want to make a list of events you need to wade through 20 different menu options to a user interface with configuration options like "boolean" and "float", build a content type, content, and then a view. Essentially you need to understand everything before you can build anything.

In an "outside-in" experience – or what Kevin OLeary (Director of Design on my team at Acquia) calls Literal UI – you can click anything on the page, edit its configuration in-place, and watch it take effect immediately.

Over the past few years Drupal has adopted a more outside-in approach, the most obvious example being Drupal 8's in-place editing. It enables you to edit what you see with an uninterrupted workflow, faster preview, and removes the need to visit the administration backend before you can start editing.

To evaluate how outside-in can be applied more broadly in order to make Drupal easier to use, Kevin created a few animated gifs.

Example #1: editing menu items

The current inside-out experience

Editing menu options in Drupal has already become more outside-in with contextual links. The contextual links take away some of the guesswork of finding the proper administration UI, but once you arrive at the configuration page there is still a lot of stuff to take in, only some of which is relevant to this task.



The current inside-out experience for editing a menu item in Drupal

The current inside-out experience for editing a menu item: adding a menu link and changing its position involves 2 separate administration pages, 4 page refreshes and more than 400 words of text on the UI.

Anyone familiar with Drupal will recognize the pattern above; you go to an administration UI, make some changes, than you go back to the page to see if it worked. This context switching creates what UX people call "cognitive load". On an administration page you need to remember what was on the site page and vice-versa.

To complete this task you need to:

  1. Find the contextual link for the menu (not simple since it's on the far side of the page)
  2. Choose the correct option "edit menu"
  3. Find and click the "add link" button
  4. Type the menu link name
  5. Type the menu link path beginning with a forward slash
  6. Understand that this change needs to be saved
  7. Scroll to the bottom of the page
  8. Save the link
  9. Find the link in the list of links
  10. Understand that dragging up/down in this abstraction is equivalent to moving right/left in that actual page
  11. Scroll to the bottom of the page
  12. Save the menu

The problem is not just that there are too many pages, clicks, or words, it's that each step away from the actual page introduces new opportunities for confusion, error and repetition. In user testing, we have seen users who were unable to find the contextual link, or to understand which option to choose, or to find the "add link" button, or to add a path, or drag-drop links, or to save before leaving the UI. When these things happen in context feedback about whether you are "doing it right" is immediate.

The proposed outside-in experience



The proposed outside-in experience for editing a menu item in Drupal

The proposed outside-in experience for editing a menu item. Rather than moving out-of-context to an administration page to get the job done, configuration happens right on the page where you see the effect of each action. You start adding a menu item simply by selecting the menu on the page. Both the menu item and the item's path are in focus to reinforce the connection. As you type a path is proposed from the link text.

Now all you need to do is:

  1. Click the menu on the page
  2. Find and click the "add link" button
  3. Type the name of the menu item
  4. Revise the menu item's path if needed
  5. Drag the link to its new location
  6. Close the drawer

One important aspect of this approach is that all actions that produce a visible change have bi-directional control and bi-directional feedback. In other words, if you can drag something in the configuration drawer you should also be able to drag it on the page, and the changes should happen simultaneously.

Example #2: adding a block to a page

The current inside-out experience

The process of adding a block can be difficult. Once you discover where to go to add a block, which is in itself a challenge, the experience requires a lot of reading and learning, as well as trial and error.



The current inside-out experience for adding a block

The current inside-out experience for adding a block. Not all steps are shown.

To complete this task you need to:

  1. Figure out where to go to place a block
  2. Go to /block-layout
  3. Go to /display-regions to find out where the region is on the page
  4. Go back to /block-layout
  5. Find the region and click "add block"
  6. Find the block you want to place and click "place block"
  7. Configure the block
  8. Read about how blocks can appear on multiple pages and for different content types and roles
  9. Read what content types are
  10. Read what roles are
  11. Read what a "path" is
  12. Read how to find the path for a page
  13. Go back to the page and get its path
  14. Go back to /block-layout and add the path to the visibility settings
  15. Drag your block to the position where you want it
  16. If your blocks are arranged horizontally, learn that "up and down" in the block layout UI will mean "left and right" on the actual page
  17. Find the"back to site" link
  18. Go back to the page to see if you did it right

Eventually you'll use what you just learned, but Drupal makes you learn it first instead of just showing what is immediately necessary. Both the task and the learning can be simplified by bringing the configuration closer to the object you are configuring.

The proposed outside-in experience



The proposed outside-in experience for adding a block

The proposed outside-in experience for adding a block. Everything happens on the actual page rather than on an administration page. Places where things can be added appear on hover. On click they show thumbnails that you can filter with autocomplete.

Now all you need to do is:

  1. Choose where to place the block
  2. Find the block you want to place
  3. Place the block
  4. Close the drawer

The "plus" button, the drop target (blue dotted rectangle) and the autocomplete are all commonly understood patterns used by other software. The task requires no or little explanation as the interactions reveal the process. By starting with selecting the location of where to place the block, we avoid the need for drag-and-drop and the complexity of dragging a block on a page that requires scrolling.

Principles and patterns

These examples show the principle that rather than taking the site builder to a separate administration backend, the experience should begin with the actual page and show how the changes will be seen by the end-user. The patterns shown here are less important. For example the animated gifs above show two different approaches to the options panel and there are certainly others. The important thing is not yet where the panel comes from or how it looks, but that the following criteria are met:

  • An option panel is triggered by direct interaction.
  • When triggered it only shows options for what you selected.
  • It primarily shows configuration options that produce a visible change to the page. More complex options could be accessed through an 'Advanced options' link.

The ideas in this post are meant to provide some food for thought and become the seed of some patches for Drupal 8.2. Rather than dive right into development, we're looking to the Drupal community to take these designs as a starting point to prototype and user-test more outside-in experiences in Drupal.

The next post in this series will cover outside-in experiences with more complex contexts and the problem of "leaky abstractions". If you don't want to miss the next blog post, make sure to subscribe. In the mean time, I'd love to hear what you think!

Special thanks to Kevin OLeary for advocating outside-in thinking. Thanks to Preston So, Gábor Hojtsy, Angie Byron, Bojhan Somers and Roy Scholten for their feedback.

Continue the conversation on buytaert.net

Front page news: 

How should you decouple Drupal?

22 March 2016, 3:38 pm

Republished from buytaert.net

With RESTful web services in Drupal 8 core, Drupal can function as an API-first back end serving browser applications, native applications on mobile devices, in-store displays, even in-flight entertainment systems (Lufthansa is doing so in Drupal 8!), and much more. When building a new website or web application in 2016, you may ask yourself: how should I decouple Drupal? Do I build my website with Drupal's built-in templating layer or do I use a JavaScript framework? Do I need Node.js?

There is a lot of hype around decoupled architectures, so before embarking on a project, it is important to make a balanced analysis. Your choice of architecture has implications on your budget, your team, time to launch, the flexibility for content creators, the ongoing maintenance of your website, and more. In this blog post, I'd like to share a flowchart that can help you decide when to use what technology.

Decoupled decision flowchart


This flowchart shows three things:

First, using coupled Drupal is a perfectly valid option for those who don't need extensive client-side rendering and state management. In this case, you would use Drupal's built-in Twig templating system rather than heavily relying on a JavaScript framework. You would use jQuery to take advantage of limited JavaScript where necessary. Also, with BigPipe in Drupal 8.1, certain use cases that typically needed asynchronous JavaScript can now be done in PHP without slowing down the page (i.e. communication with an external web service delaying the display of user-specific real-time data). The advantage of this approach is that content marketers are not blocked by front-end developers as they assemble their user experiences, thus shortening time to market and reducing investment in ongoing developer support.

Second, if you want all of the benefits of a JavaScript framework without completely bypassing Drupal's HTML generation and all that you get with it, I recommend using progressively decoupled Drupal. With progressive decoupling, you start with Drupal's HTML output, and then use a JavaScript framework to add client-side interactivity on the client side. One of the most visited sites in the world, The Weather Channel (100 million unique visitors per month), does precisely this with Angular 1 layered on top of Drupal 7. In this case, you can enjoy the benefits of having a “decoupled" team made up of both Drupal and JavaScript developers progressing at their own velocities. JavaScript developers can build richly interactive experiences while leaving content marketers free to assemble those experiences without needing a developer's involvement.

Third, whereas fully decoupled Drupal makes a lot of sense when building native applications, for most websites, the leap to fully decoupling is not strictly necessary, though a growing number of people prefer using JavaScript these days. Advantages include some level of independence on the underlying CMS, the ability to tap into a rich toolset around JavaScript (e.g. Babel, Webpack, etc.) and a community of JavaScript front-end professionals. But if you are using a universal JavaScript approach with Drupal, it's also important to consider the drawbacks: you need to ask yourself if you're ready to add more complexity to your technology stack and possibly forgo functionality provided by a more integrated content delivery system, such as layout and display management, user interface localization, and more. Losing that functionality can be costly, increase your dependence on a developer team, and hinder the end-to-end content assembly experience your marketing team expects, among other things.

It's worth noting that over time we are likely to see better integrations between Drupal and the different JavaScript frameworks (e.g. Drupal modules that export their configuration, and SDKs for different JavaScript frameworks that use that configuration on the client-side). When those integrations mature, I expect more people will move towards fully decoupled Drupal.

To be performant, fully decoupled websites using JavaScript employ Node.js on the server to improve initial performance, but in the case of Drupal this is not necessary, as Drupal can do the server-side pre-rendering for you. Many JavaScript developers opt to use Node.js for the convenience of shared rendering across server and client rather than for the specific things that Node.js excels in, like real-time push, concurrent connections, and bidirectional client-server communication. In other words, most Drupal websites don't need Node.js.

Decoupled delivery architectures


In practice, I believe many organizations want to use all of these content delivery options. In certain cases, you want to let your content management system render the experience so you can take full advantage of its features with minimal or no development effort (coupled architecture). But when you need to build a website that needs a much more interactive experience or that integrates with unique devices (i.e. on in-store touch screens), you should be able to use that same content management system's content API (decoupled architecture). Fortunately, Drupal allows you to use either. The beauty of choosing from the spectrum of fully decoupled Drupal, progressively decoupled Drupal, and coupled Drupal is that you can do what makes the most sense in each situation.

Special thanks to Preston So, Alex Bronstein and Wim Leers for contributions to this blog post. We created at least 10 versions of this flowchart before settling on this one.

Continue the conversation on buytaert.net

Front page news: 

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

Drupal.org updates

Drupal 6 is now end of life

”Druplicon”

As of February 24, 2016, Drupal 6 is at end of life (EOL). To support the end of life process for this version of Drupal, Association staff are ensuring that users are prompted to update to the final version of Drupal 6, and that site owners are made aware of the implications of EOL. Because the community at large no longer supports Drupal 6, site owners are encouraged to move to Drupal 7 or 8, or to work with one of the Drupal 6 Long Term Support vendors.

Our board's director at-large election

”Hands

In February, self-nominations opened for a single director at-large position on the Association board. This is one of two such seats on the board that are decided by community election.

Now that nominations have closed, you can review candidate profiles and watch the Meet the Candidate webinars. Voting will run from March 7-18, and will be promoted to all eligible voters with a banner on Drupal.org.

Composer support for Drupal

Logo: WizardCat.com

In February, we continued the community initiative to support Composer on Drupal.org. Over the last several months, we’ve been working closely with members of the community, as well as with the maintainer of Composer and Packagist.org.

Drupal.org will provide two Composer endpoints: one for Drupal 7 projects, and one for Drupal 8. These separate endpoints will allow Drupal.org to translate Drupal-style contrib version numbers into the true semantic versioning that Composer expects. This will also help support a transparent movement to a more semantic versioning for contrib projects on Drupal.org.

We hope to provide a beta of this Drupal.org Composer support in March.

Manage your Drupal.org notifications

In January, we updated Drupal.org to allow users to follow many more content types, including Forum Topics, Posts, Case Studies, and documentation Book Pages. However, now that users are able to receive email notification for activity on a wide variety of content on Drupal.org, we also needed to provide some better tools for managing those notifications.

Follow notifications UI

A new tab now appears on every user's profile called "Notifications," which allows the user to configure, per content type, whether they want to receive email notifications when following that content, or simply add it to the their tracker (the “Your Posts” part of the Dashboard).

More insight into organization contributions

For some time now, the Drupal.org Marketplace has displayed recent issue credits attributed to the organizations that provide Drupal services to our ecosystem. However, there’s been no way to see the contributions attributed to non-service providers (that is, organizations that don’t sell Drupal services).

Until now. The drupal.org/organizations view now shows all organizations ranked by attributed issue credits, whether they’re a Drupal service provider, a customer, or even a community organization like a DrupalCamp. To promote this greater visbility, we've also highlighted the top 10 contributing customers of Drupal. We hope to continue to improve the many ways we track and display user and organization contributions, and would love your feedback.

Content restructure: Documentation

In 2015, we did a tremendous amount of work developing a comprehensive content strategy for Drupal.org. In 2016, we’re making great strides in implementing that strategy through a content restructure. The main idea behind the content restructure is the reorganization of our content into sections that can each have their own maintainership, governance, and related content.

Perhaps the most critical new section is Documentation. The new Documentation section will bring easier navigation, maintainership of documentation guides, better related content, and more relevant metadata to documentation on Drupal.org. We’re doing usability testing of our prototype of this new section now.

Sustaining support and maintenance

DrupalCon Asia: A landmark moment

DrupalCon Asia logo

February was also the time for DrupalCon Asia—at last! The event held at IITB in Mumbai hosted over 1,000 attendees, 82% of whom were first-time DrupalCon attendees. With Association staff both in Mumbai and providing remote support it was an incredibly challenging, colorful, rewarding, and enlightening event.

We're proud to have brought the Asian community the DrupalCon they deserved. As the second largest region of users on Drupal.org, behind only the United States, we expect tremendous things from this vibrant community.

Jobs.drupal.org—tweeting the best opportunities in Drupal

Fostering and promoting the Drupal ecosystem is an important part of the Association’s mission. Drupal powers the best of the web, from single-installation to large-scale enterprise sites. Drupal Jobs provides companies a way to find the best Drupal talent, and provides Drupal developers a way to find open source-friendly careers. We recently updated jobs.drupal.org so that new positions are tweeted from the @drupaljobs handle.

DrupalCI: troubleshooting a PHP 5.6 garbage collection bug

DrupalCI Logo

Our infrastructure team investigated a random failure in Core branch tests that happened when testing against PHP 5.6. Whenever a random failure like this appears on our testing infrastructure, it’s important for us to track down the cause. Is it a problem in testbot configuration, an unusual kind of regression introduced in code or in the test itself, or a bug in an underlying part of the stack, like PHP itself? For now, we believe the issue is related to PHP garbage collection, and we’re trying to reproduce it so that we can open a bug for PHP.

Upgrading Drupal.org servers to PHP 5.4

PHP 5.3 limitations may have caused some recent instability (like the outages on the weekend of February 14). Because of this instability, we upgraded our production and pre-production servers to PHP 5.4. We’d previously held off on this upgrade due to two sub-sites: qa.drupal.org (QA) and groups.drupal.org (GDO). However, we used this opportunity to statically archive QA (now that it is superseded by DrupalCI), and to upgrade outdated parts of GDO to work with PHP 5.4.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Richard Burford (psynaptic) was an active contributor in the Drupal community. After he joined the community in late 2006, he actively encouraged, organized, and mentored other community members, while also posting more than 1,100 commits.

On February 11, Richard unexpectedly passed away while jogging. He’s survived by his wife, Sara, and their three children, William (aged 2), and twins Lucy and Kate (age 1). This spotlight has been a collaborative community project, and showcases just a few of the many qualities and contributions admired most about Richard.

Richard Burford at DrupalCon Paris
(Photo taken by Dan Smith (galooph) outside a bar at DrupalCon Paris.)

"I got to know psynaptic through #drupal-uk (back when it was still #drupaluk). He was kind, generous and funny," said James Panton(mcjim). " There were lots of late-night chats on IRC where we talked about Drupal, music, anything really. We were​ all very​ excited when he could make it to Manchester for the UK’s first DrupalCamp. He was even kinder, funnier, and more generous in real life"

Richard was active both in his local community, and in the wider Drupal world.

"I first met Richard at DrupalCamp Manchester, my first ever DrupalCamp," said Simon Poulston (soulston). "Richard instantly stood out with his insatiable energy, positivity and that beaming smile we all came to know. That Manchester trip resulted in our trip to DrupalCon Paris where we both made some amazing new friends from the community and had a truly epic time. We worked on projects together over the next few years, roomed at camps together, shared music, and remained friends ever since."

As it turned out, DrupalCon Paris was an important point in Richard's Drupal journey: it was there that he made numerous lasting friendships, and it started his journey to multiple DrupalCons around the world.

"Rich and I both started working with Drupal around the same time and quickly became friends, first on the #drupal-uk IRC channel before actually meeting for real at DrupalCon Paris," said Stella Power (stella). "He was a great guy. Not only was he always willing to help out, but he was also good company, always smiling and great fun to hang out with."

Alex Pott (alexpott) had a similar story to tell. "I went to DrupalCon Paris knowing nobody in the Drupal community. Richard was the first person I met. How lucky was that? Meeting someone so warm, generous and talented is one of the reasons I haven't missed a DrupalCon since."

"I knew how clever, knowledgeable, and helpful Richard was from seeing him online," said Elliot Ward (Eli-T). "But when I shared a room with him at DrupalCon Copenhagen, I found out how much fun he was as well. In that week Richard taught me so much: how to contribute back, how to roll a patch, how to advocate in the issue queues, and what a chicken parmo was. He went out of his way to introduce me to so many people that week, many of whom I've worked with since. That was when I realized how important the community is in Drupal—all because of the actions of one man looking out for someone he'd never met before."

"Always such a great part of the Drupal community"

Even when he wasn't fostering global connections, Richard was still actively helping out his community. A founding member of England's Drupal North East group, Richard left his mark on the Drupal community in every way he could.

"We met at DrupalCons across the world several times, and at DrupalCon Copenhagen we decided that it was ridiculous that we hadn't actually met back home. That was when we started the Drupal North East group together," said Adam Hill (adshill). In the time since the group was founded, Drupal North East has grown into a thriving community with over 100 members. "Richard has left a legacy of being one of the motivated troopers who rallied the Drupal community in his own area of the world," Hill said. "But he did so much more too, supporting people across the world with his generous nature and amazing spirit."

"He was always so helpful and such a great part of the Drupal community here in the UK," agreed Mike Bell (mikebell_). "We will miss him dearly."

Regardless of where he was, Richard's helpfulness was always on display. Whether he was helping new Drupalers find their feet on IRC, evangelizing Drupal with his local user group, or participate in a DrupalCon, Richard was always an important source of information and good cheer.

"I first met Richard and his [then] newlywed wife, Sara, at DrupalCon Denver. I was fairly new to Drupal at the time," said Alex Burrows (aburrows). "He welcomed me into the group, and we wound up attending many parties together, having good laughs, and drinking lots of beer. He was down to earth and always lightened up the conversation. It was a pleasure, and meant a lot."

Mike Carter (budda) agreed. "At DrupalCamps and Cons you couldn't miss Richard towering above the Drupal crowd, happy to chat with all. On IRC, he was always happy to help others with their Drupal questions. He was dedicated, knowledgeable, and enthusiastic about whatever challenge was brought to him."

Justine Pocock (wigglykoala) benefited from Richard's mentoring, and thanks him for some of the best guidance she's ever received. "When I first started with Drupal, I went into IRC trying to figure out what this CMS thing did. Richard (psynaptic) was one of the first people to help me there and show me the way. He was also one of the first to tell me to shut up and get my head down with learning Drupal—which actually is one of the most valuable pieces of advice I've been given! I've always (and will always) look up to Richard as a truly dedicated person."

"Fierce, dedicated, focused, and generous, Richard impressed me as he impressed and helped so many of us in the Drupal community," agreed Jeffrey A. McGuire (horncologne).

"He seemed to have near-limitless energy for getting things done ‘the right way’"

That fierce dedication helped Richard develop a reputation in the community of being an extremely passionate advocate not only for the project, but for programming and web development in general.

"I'll never forget the day that Richard introduced me to Drupal," said his longtime friend Dan Traynor (hitby). "We built a Teacher's Toolkit (in Drupal 5!) in a few hours and I was a convert. From that point on we attended a few DrupalCons together where he introduced me to many amazing developers. That forged my love for Drupal and the community. I can honestly say that without Rich I'm not sure I'd still be in the web development game."

"Richard inspired me to take my business forward in the ‘right’ way, by paying attention to detail and expressing my belief in the craft of programming," said Hill (adshill). "He was someone who clearly believed in the pleasure and value of giving, and he gave so much."

"Richard started contributing to the Textmate project during the pre-PHPStorm era, and he really made it shine," said Moshe Weitzman (moshe-weitzman). "He eventually took it over and maintained it as Drupal core and contrib grew and grew. Maintenance is a non-trivial and often unrewarding task, and it spoke a lot to his character that he would step up like that."

In addition to maintaining the Textmate project, Richard maintained Drupal Contrib API, and worked in a variety of technical roles within the Software Development, Web Design, Drupal Training, and Music Production industries. Most recently, Richard worked at Acquia as a senior software engineer.

"I’ve spoken with many people in recent days about Richard, and many described him as their favourite person in the company," said Alan Evans (alan-evans) of Acquia. "He was hugely popular: always the first person to offer a warm-hearted welcome to newcomers, or help people out with questions. And he had a talent for keeping the team in good spirits with his quick wit and laughter.

"Richard seemed to have near-limitless energy for getting things done ‘the right way’ and would pursue that goal with enviable zeal. His perfectionism didn’t necessarily agree with everyone all of the time, but he was greatly respected for having the courage to stick to his guns," he added.

"He was always there when you needed him"

Whether he was helping with code or with housework, Richard's belief in doing things the right way always shone through. He was always there for those who needed him. Now, the community is paying that love forward.

Poulston (soulston) said of his friend, "Richard was a shining example to us all of how one person truly can make a difference. He helped me and many other people countless times, and you could tell that genuinely enjoyed helping people be the best they could at whatever they did, be it music or code. That’s not only a talent, but a trait of a beautiful human being."

"Rich was always there when you needed him," agreed Traynor (hitby). "His need for perfection pushed into every area of his life. He once came to help me wallpaper a room, a task that I imagined would take about a day. Three days later we finished. I've never seen wallpaper so smooth! Thinking about it, Rich got me into many things: mountain biking, vaping (yes, I have him to thank for quitting smoking as well), music...the list goes on. The world was a better place with him in it and I'm proud to be able to have called him a friend." He added, "I love you Rich, Sara, William, Lucy, and Kate."

Hill (adshill) had wishes of peace for Richard's family as well. "Sara, I only met you twice, and you may not remember us," he said, "but my girlfriend Ieva and I send all our love to you and the kids. We hope you gain strength from knowing that we all saw how special Richard was too —and that he will be missed by friends from across the world."

"Richard was a good friend, a proud family man, and an excellent developer: a larger-than-life personality that left a lasting impression with those he met," agreed Evans (alan-evans). "I know a visit to a DrupalCon (or even the office) is not going to be the same without him. We all miss him very much."

But perhaps everyone's feelings about Richard were best summed up by Pott (alexpott), who said simply: "Richard is one of the brightest stars I've ever met. I count myself lucky to have known him."

Whether you knew Richard personally or were introduced to him for the first time through this spotlight, Richard’s friends would like to encourage you to consider donating to the GoFundMe page that was set up in Richard's memory, benefitting his wife and children.

The Drupal community has lost a valued collaborator and advocate in Richard, but his contributions both to the project and to people’s lives will always live on.

Special thanks to the following Drupal community members for their help with this community spotlight:

Drupal 8.0.5 released

3 March 2016, 1:13 am

Update: Drupal 8.0.6 is now available. We will no longer post front page announcements for every monthly bugfix release, but you can always follow the Drupal project page to find the latest release.

Drupal 8.0.5, a maintenance release with numerous bug fixes (no security fixes), is now available for download.

See the Drupal 8.0.5 release notes for a full list of included fixes.

Upgrading your existing Drupal 8 sites is recommended. There are no major nor non-backwards-compatible features in this release. For more information about the Drupal 8.x release series, consult the Drupal 8 overview.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 8 includes the built-in Update Manager module, which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

There are no security fixes in this release of Drupal core.

Bug reports

Drupal 8.0.x is actively maintained, so more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Change log

Drupal 8.0.5 contains bug fixes and documentation and testing improvements only. The full list of changes between the last 8.0.x patch release and the 8.0.5 release can be found by reading the 8.0.5 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 8.0.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Update notes

See the 8.0.5 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

See the 8.0.5 release notes for known issues.

Front page news: 
Drupal version: 

Top 10 contributing customers

2 March 2016, 11:05 pm

We spent a lot of time thinking about how to highlight the organizations in our Marketplace that are actively contributing to the project. There are some awesome Drupal shops and hosting partners out there that are making a huge difference.

Service providers that you see in the marketplace are only part of the story of how Drupal is built.

Last week, we launched a new list of organizations on Drupal.org that shows every profile that has been created for an organization. This includes companies, universities, nonprofits, governments and more. These are our customers and community organizations that use Drupal to power their web experiences. By giving their developers time to contribute code back to the community, they are helping to ensure the project gets the best ideas from the most diverse group of makers and builders.

While the new view shows all organizations, I was able to pull out the top 10 customers—organizations that do not sell Drupal services or hosting—and community organizations (e.g. community from a region).

So who have been most active among this type of organization over the last 90 days?

  1. Examiner.com - 56 issue credits
  2. Pfizer - 29 issue credits
  3. Freitag - 19 issue credits
  4. Drupal Ukraine Community - 17 issue credits
  5. ARTE G.E.I.E. - 15 issue credits
  6. University of Waterloo - 13 issue credits
  7. Card.com - 13 issue credits
  8. Gemeente Venlo - 11 issue credits
  9. Dennis Publishing - 9 issue credits (and they are Drupal Association members to boot!)
  10. NBCUniversal - 7 issue credits

Check out the full list of every organization with a profile on Drupal.org. Keep in mind, we can only track issue credits when issue participants credit an organization and when maintainers award those credits.

Only organizations with a profile on Drupal.org can be credited. Confirmed users can add new organizations.

We are all excited to see where this takes us and what we can learn about how organizations that use Drupal are giving back.

If your company or organization wants to give back in ways other than contributing in the code and issue queues, consider becoming an organization member, joining one of our supporter programs, or sponsoring a DrupalCon or camp.

Introducing Sections on Drupal.org

29 February 2016, 2:00 pm

Last year Drupal Association staff—in collaboration with Forum One—analyzed the state of content on Drupal.org. We developed a content strategy aimed at improving its quality and findability. Various recommendations were made for content structure, organization, and governance.

One of the main recommendations was to restructure content around areas of user activity instead of the content type used to create the content. On Drupal.org, content about a topic is often scattered, because some content types are only available in certain areas. But we’d rather have a single place for content on a particular topic, no matter which content types are used to create that content.

User research gave us a number of general areas of user activity or tasks, which we used as a base for top level content grouping. We’ve called those groupings “sections.” Each section is based around a particular set of common user tasks and has a clear purpose and audience. We started implementing these sections a few weeks ago.

Each of them will also have a slightly different governance structure. Some of the sections will have more editorial/curated content, while others will be open to edits by everyone. We wanted the flexibility of having different user roles with different permissions in different sections. We also wanted the flexibility of being able to display a single piece of content in multiple sections if needed, and perhaps even use a different theme per section.

To meet those requirements we decided to use Organic Groups. The work on getting all the modules ready on Drupal.org began in August last year. After a few rounds of performance testing and configuration review, Organic Groups and a few accompanying modules were in place to enable us to work on sections. The first couple of them were launched simultaneously with the Drupal 8 release.

Drupal.org section

At first, we wanted to test out our ideas and assumptions on a less visible area of the site with lower traffic. So, the first section we created was about Drupal.org itself. It consists of various information about the website, aimed at those who follow or take part in Drupal.org development. Its content is mostly produced by our internal team.

About section

The first highly visible section we tackled was About. It is a source of general information about Drupal and promotional materials. The content is curated and aimed primarily at evaluators, and the Newcomer and Learner personas.

To create the section, we audited all the content in the old “About Drupal” area (which was using the old book page content type), rewrote most of it, and re-created it using the new content types. While the initial round of work on the section is complete, there are a few more things we want to do, so expect additions to the section throughout the year.

Because of the curated nature of the content, this section has tight edit permissions, and is managed by the Drupal Association staff. Feedback is always welcome, however, so if you do notice a problem please use the Content issue queue to report it.

A big part of the About section is talking about the features of the Drupal software. And specifically with the Drupal 8 launch, we wanted to do it well, which brings us to...

Drupal 8 section

It is the landing page for Drupal 8 release, and the main source of high level information about Drupal 8 and its features. And it is a section too, created using Organic Groups and located inside of the About section.

This one was created from scratch. All the content was written specifically for it, by the Drupal Association's communications team with a lot of help, review, and feedback from Core committers team.

For this section, we went one step further. Not only does it have unique content, it was also designed to look completely different from the rest of Drupal.org. To make it happen, we created a separate theme, based on Omega, and used og_theme module to make it possible to use the theme on only one particular section of the site. This worked really well.

Again, this section has curated content and edit permissions are locked down. If you do find a problem, please report via the Content issue queue.

What's next?

These new sections don’t only introduce a new governance model and navigation patterns. They also introduce a new way we create dynamic content. I will talk more about this, as well as the sections we are working on right now, in following posts.

The Rise of Drupal in India

26 February 2016, 7:58 pm

Republished from buytaert.net

Earlier this week I returned from DrupalCon Asia, which took place at IIT Bombay, one of India's premier engineering universities. I wish I could have bottled up all the energy and excitement to take home with me. From dancing on stage, to posing for what felt like a million selfies, to a motorcycle giveaway, this DrupalCon was unlike any I've seen before.

Drupalcon group photo

A little over 1,000 people attended the first DrupalCon in India. For 82% of the attendees, it was their first DrupalCon. There was also much better gender diversity than at other DrupalCons.


The excitement and interest around Drupal has been growing fast since I last visited in 2011. DrupalCamp attendance in both Delhi and Mumbai has exceeded 500 participants. There have also been DrupalCamps held in Hyderabad, Bangalore, Pune, Ahmedabad Jaipur, Srinagar, Kerala and other areas.

Indian Drupal companies like QED42, Axelerant, Srijan and ValueBound have made meaningful contributions to Drupal 8. The reason? Visibility on Drupal.org through the credit system helps them win deals and hire the best talent. ValueBound said it best when I spoke to them: "With our visibility on drupal.org, we no longer have to explain why we are a great place to work and that we are experts in Drupal.".

Also present were the large System Integrators (Wipro, TATA Consultancy Services, CapGemini, Accenture, MindTree, etc). TATA Consultancy Services has 400+ Drupalists in India, well ahead of the others who have between 100 and 200 Drupalists each. Large digital agencies such as Mirum and AKQA also sent people to DrupalCon. They are all expanding their Drupal teams in India to service the needs of growing sales in other offices around the world. The biggest challenge across the board? Finding Drupal talent. I was told that TCS allows many of its developers to contribute back to Drupal, which is why they have been able to hire faster. More evidence that the credit system is working in India.

The government is quickly adopting Drupal. MyGov.in is one of many great examples; this portal was established by India's central government to promote citizen participation in government affairs. The site reached nearly two million registered users in less than a year. The government's shifting attitude toward open source is a big deal because historically, the Indian government has pushed back against open source because large organizations like Microsoft were funding many of the educational programs in India. The tide changed in 2015 when the Indian government announced that open source software should be preferred over proprietary software for all e-government projects. Needless to say, this is great news for Drupal.

Another initiative that stood out was the Drupal Campus Ambassador Program. The aim of this program is to appoint Drupal ambassadors in every university in India to introduce more students to Drupal and help them with their job search. It is early days for the program, but I recommend we pay attention to it, and consider scaling it out globally if successful.

Last but not least there was FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education), a government-funded program that provides affordable computers to Indian students. To date, 2,000 universities participate in the program and nearly 2 million units have been sold. With curriculum translated into 22 local languages, students gain the ability to self-study and foster their education outside of the classroom. I was excited to hear that FOSSEE plans to add a Drupal course to its offerings. There is a strong demand for affordable Drupal training and certifications throughout India's technical colleges, so the idea of encouraging millions of Indian students to take a free Drupal course is very exciting -- even if only 1% of them decides to contribute back this could be a total game changers.

Open source makes a lot of sense for India's thriving tech community. It is difficult to grasp the size of the opportunity for Drupal in India and how fast its adoption has been growing. I have a feeling I will be back in India more than once to help support this growing commitment to Drupal and open source.

Continue the conversation on buytaert.net

Front page news: 

Update: Drupal 8.0.5 is now available.

Drupal 8.0.4, Drupal 7.43, and Drupal 6.38, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download.

See the Drupal 8.0.4, Drupal 7.43, and Drupal 6.38 release notes for further information.

Upgrading your existing Drupal 8, 7, and 6 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features nor non-security-related bug fixes in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 8.0.x release series, consult the Drupal 8 overview. More information on the Drupal 7.x release series can be found in the Drupal 7.0 release announcement, and more information on the Drupal 6.x release series can be found in the Drupal 6.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 8 and 7 include the built-in Update Manager module, which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes. Drupal 6 has reached its end of life (EOL) and will not get further updates.

Bug reports

Both Drupal 8.0.x and 7.x are being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports) more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Drupal 6 has reached its end of life (EOL), so it will not receive further bug fixes or official releases.

Change log

Drupal 8.0.4 is a security release only. For more details, see the 8.0.4 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 8.0.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 7.43 is a security release only. For more details, see the 7.43 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 6.38 is a security release only. For more details, see the 6.38 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the end-of-life 6.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 8.0.4, 7.43, and 6.38 were released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisories:

To fix the security problem, please upgrade to either Drupal 8.0.4, Drupal 7.43, or Drupal 6.38.

Update notes

See the 8.0.4, 7.43, or 6.38 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

See the 8.0.4, 7.43, or 6.38 release notes for a list of known issues affecting each release.

Drupal.org, the home of the Drupal community, has grown organically for many years. At some point it grew so large that a clear decision making structure became a necessity. The Drupal Association staff was not in the place to provide it at that time: our entire technology team for Drupal.org, including all its sub-sites and services, consisted of only two people, myself and Neil Drumm—so we turned to community for help.

In the summer of 2013, the three Drupal.org Working Groups were announced. Governance committees, consisting of community members and staff, created to act as a collective 'product owner' for the website. In the following two and a half years, with their guidance and feedback, we implemented many new features, performed user research, developed content strategy, and drastically improved the infrastructure behind Drupal.org.

At the same time the Drupal Association staff kept growing. We hired our first full-time infrastructure staff member, brought in the CTO and customer service coordinator a few months later, then a developer and two more infrastructure team members. And finally, we hired a project manager, a web designer, and one more Drupal developer. Our communications team grew, too: over the last two years, the Drupal Association brought in a content strategist and a dedicated writer. Overall, our capacity increased and a lot of gaps in skills and experience were filled.

Having skilled staff working full-time on Drupal.org, we were finally able to provide product direction, set a roadmap, and execute on it. We adopted Scrum as our project management methodology, with a new sprint starting every two weeks. This encourages iteration and pivoting based on the situation, instead of working against a 'set in stone' year long plan. As our staffing situation changed, we started to realize that the valuable time of dedicated community volunteers can be spent more efficiently than making them sit in countless planning and update meetings with staff.

At the end of last year, the Drupal Association Board, with the input of several Working Group members, made a decision that it is time for staff to work on Drupal.org improvements directly with the community. This means that the Drupal.org Working Groups will transition into an advisory group, with former Drupal.org Working Groups members available as advisors to provide feedback and input on specific initiatives the team is working on, relevant to their own skills and expertise.

The only requirement the Board and Drupal.org Working Groups themselves put out before the transition could happen is this: they asked that the Association staff create a clear process for community members to be able to suggest items on the Drupal.org roadmap, and provide a path for those community members to volunteer to help with implementation. With the input from the Working Groups and the Board, we created such a process. It was
launched last week.

As we reach the end of an era, I'd like to personally thank each member who served at various times on Drupal.org Working Groups over the past three years. Your time, skills, and experience you shared with us has been invaluable.

Gerhard Killesreiter / killes
Narayan Newton / nnewton
Melissa Anderson / eliza411
Angela Byron / webchick
Kim Pepper / kim.pepper
George DeMet / gdemet
Jeff Eaton / eaton
Roy Scholten / yoroy
David Hernandez / davidhernandez
Cathy Theys / YesCT

Thank you! It's been a pleasure to share all those moments, conversations, ideas, debates, and workshops.

While the role of these wonderful people is shifting to a less formal advisory one, we will still be calling on their expertise and help as we continue our work on making Drupal.org a better place.

--
Image by Roy Scholten.